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Lameness in the Juvenile Dog – Part 1: Developmental diseases

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Lameness in the Juvenile Dog – Part 1: Developmental diseases

Developmental diseases, those that cause lameness in the skeletally immature dog, are relatively common. A structured approach is required to achieve a diagnosis, as with the adult dog. However, given the potential for some of these conditions to have an impact on future joint health, prompt diagnosis and treatment may be of greater importance. Differentials for lameness in the skeletally immature dog include hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, osteochondrosis and Legg Calve Perthes disease. Surgery to treat hip dysplasia in the juvenile dog may be possible depending on the age of the animal at presentation and the severity of the disease. Similarly, there is an emphasis on early debridement of osteochondrosis or coronoid disease lesions to give superior outcomes. There is little evidence that restriction of exercise will reduce the impact of future osteoarthritis, so the historical emphasis on a combination of rest and analgesia should be considered secondary to achieving a prompt diagnosis.

Vol 8 - Issue 3
Written by Philip Witte BSc BVSc CertAVP(GSAS) DSAS(Orth) MRCVS
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Lameness in the Juvenile Dog - Part 1: Developmental diseases

Lameness in the Juvenile Dog – Part 1: Developmental diseases

Developmental diseases, those that cause lameness in the skeletally immature dog, are relatively common. A structured approach is required to achieve a diagnosis, as with the adult dog. However, given the potential for some of these conditions to have an impact on future joint health, prompt diagnosis and treatment may be of greater importance. Differentials for lameness in the skeletally immature dog include hip dysplasia, elbow dysplasia, osteochondrosis and Legg Calve Perthes disease. Surgery to treat hip dysplasia in the juvenile dog may be possible depending on the age of the animal at presentation and the severity of the disease. Similarly, there is an emphasis on early debridement of osteochondrosis or coronoid disease lesions to give superior outcomes. There is little evidence that restriction of exercise will reduce the impact of future osteoarthritis, so the historical emphasis on a combination of rest and analgesia should be considered secondary to achieving a prompt diagnosis.

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All our Tutored Online CPD Courses are written and taught by an expert in the relevant field. The tutor for this course is:

Philip Witte BSc BVSc CertAVP(GSAS) DSAS(Orth) MRCVS

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