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Update on the management of the seizuring cat

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Update on the management of the seizuring cat

Seizures are a common neurological condition in cats. The causes of seizures in cats can be diverse. It is important to determine the underlying cause to allow effective treatment; however, contrary to popular belief Idiopathic epilepsy (of unknown cause) is not an uncommon diagnosis in cats, although it is more common between the ages of 1-5 years. The age of diagnosis however, appears to vary more widely than in dogs. Epilepsy is a chronic condition which can require lifelong treatment; there are however, no licenced maintenance treatments for seizuring cats in the UK. Phenobarbitone decreases the seizure frequency in 60->90% of cats with idiopathic epilepsy (IE). Levetiracetam is more effective than phenobarbitone at treating seizures in cats with audiogenic reflex seizures. Evidence for the use of other anti-epileptic medications in cats is scant, and it should be remembered that some drugs, such as potassium bromide are contraindicated. Prognosis is dependant on the underlying cause, but in cats with idiopathic epilepsy (of unknown cause), it is thought to be favourable.

Vol 8 - Issue 2
Written by Camilla J Cooper BVSc Dip ECVN FHEA MRCVS RCVS & European Specialist in Veterinary Neurology
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Update on the management of the seizuring cat

Update on the management of the seizuring cat

Seizures are a common neurological condition in cats. The causes of seizures in cats can be diverse. It is important to determine the underlying cause to allow effective treatment; however, contrary to popular belief Idiopathic epilepsy (of unknown cause) is not an uncommon diagnosis in cats, although it is more common between the ages of 1-5 years. The age of diagnosis however, appears to vary more widely than in dogs. Epilepsy is a chronic condition which can require lifelong treatment; there are however, no licenced maintenance treatments for seizuring cats in the UK. Phenobarbitone decreases the seizure frequency in 60->90% of cats with idiopathic epilepsy (IE). Levetiracetam is more effective than phenobarbitone at treating seizures in cats with audiogenic reflex seizures. Evidence for the use of other anti-epileptic medications in cats is scant, and it should be remembered that some drugs, such as potassium bromide are contraindicated. Prognosis is dependant on the underlying cause, but in cats with idiopathic epilepsy (of unknown cause), it is thought to be favourable.

All our Tutored Online CPD Courses are written and taught by an expert in the relevant field. The tutor for this course is:

Camilla J Cooper BVSc Dip ECVN FHEA MRCVS RCVS & European Specialist in Veterinary Neurology

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